Turns and dizziness

#21
When I read original post I thought the same. One or two turns by themselves shouldn't cause dizziness.

To OP: if you do a few turns by yourself do you feel dizzy? If you do, may be best to see a doctor and discuss. It could be something very simple. There are reasons some people feel dizzy due to motion sickness (e.g. when seating in front than back of the car), imbalance, etc. Hopefully as you acclimatise with dancing more, your dizziness will go away.

Here is a good short description on biological/anatomical explanation of mechanisms causing dizziness and imbalance.
Motion sickness is a big theme for me. I have it simce forever, it became a Little bit better with time but I still get sick when driving bus/car sometimes or flying...I could not read a book in the car and I would never ever do a boat-cruise or go on a roller coaster.
I hope so too because I really like dancing, even as a bloody beginner and of course I wanna improve and not always be the woman who cant do turns. :confused:
 
#22
OK, there is some good advice here but also misinformation, so any inexperienced readers should be careful.

First of all, spotting absolutely works. It's not just one technique but a general principle - keep your eyes on a non-moving point as much as possible. With a lot of experience you can learn to not get dizzy even without it like the figure ice-skaters - I am not an expert there so I don't know exactly what techniques they use. But for the rest of us mere mortals, we should just learn to control our eyes and head movement.

The worst thing you can do is move your head and eyes together with your body and trace the room. I suspect that this is exactly what you did. It is a natural reaction when you don't have the experience and you panic a bit from all these unfamiliar moves, you stiffen your body, including your neck and there you go!

To give you an example, I am also a follower and have been dancing for a bit less than 20 years (if you only count salsa). I have done my fair share of spinning on the dance floor and I can't remember when was the last time I got dizzy. Certainly many, many years ago. So, I did a small experiment just now. I turned several times (not even fast spinning) while tracing the room in this way and I got dizzy after the second turn.

Don't start thinking that there is something wrong with you. It sounds perfectly normal. Try some version of spotting, practice on your own, give it some time and if nothing works, then you can worry. But for now it just sounds like you have some work to do.
Thank you so much for your reply. It gave me some hope. I will practice and try to follow your advices!
 
#23
Motion sickness is a big theme for me. I have it simce forever, it became a Little bit better with time but I still get sick when driving bus/car sometimes or flying...I could not read a book in the car and I would never ever do a boat-cruise or go on a roller coaster.
If it makes you feel better, I am like that too. It certainly got better with age and I also learned to deal with it better. Resting your eyes on a non-moving object helps in motion sickness, too. One reason why sitting in front in the car is easier - you can look in the distance which is much more static than looking through the side windows.

So, nothing to worry about. You'll get there.
 
#24
Motion sickness is a big theme for me. I have it simce forever, it became a Little bit better with time but I still get sick when driving bus/car sometimes or flying...I could not read a book in the car and I would never ever do a boat-cruise or go on a roller coaster.
I hope so too because I really like dancing, even as a bloody beginner and of course I wanna improve and not always be the woman who cant do turns. :confused:
In that case practice spotting. Better to spot something fixed at a distance. Some teachers will tell you to spot the leader, but if the leader moves, it would hinder.

You can practice turning and spotting by yourself at home.
 

Jag75

Son Montuno
#25
Dizziness is something that goes away with time, *but* you need to do a lot of spinning for it to eventually go away. One way to reduce dizziness is also to spot correctly. Good spotting requires a good instructor to learn and a lot of practice.
 

Jag75

Son Montuno
#26
Thanks for your advice. I already read the old Posts concerning spins and spotting but it didnt really help me in the Situation because the guy was leading me and I never know when he was going to turn me and how often and intowhich direction.
I told him that I was a beginner but he didn't care and after 1 Minute I prayed that I wont faint or even throw up :eek::confused:
Trust me when I tell you this - from your perspective that guy may seem like a good dancer. He is *not*. Any dancer who has a modicum of good social dance experience will dance to your level and make you feel comfortable. Next time he does so, let him know you've received guidance from actual good dancers that what he's doing is a sign of inexperience. It'll bite his ego, but he needs it.
 
#27
Dizziness is something that goes away with time, *but* you need to do a lot of spinning for it to eventually go away. One way to reduce dizziness is also to spot correctly. Good spotting requires a good instructor to learn and a lot of practice.
Atm Im only learning cuban style and have the impressions the teachers (at least here in Germany) dont do spins and of course no spotting. But maybe if I learn a linear style this will Change.
 

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