Overused lines in salsa songs

#1
Let’s see how fun or boring this can be. I recently listened to a plethora of songs (close to 14 hours a day of salsa music) and it occurred to me that there are lines that keep coming back in many songs. I thought this could be a little fun for people to mention what lines think that they are overused.

Allow me to start the chain with my line:
“Nadie sabe como sufro yo”.
Let’s try to limit one line per response.
 
#4
"Ave Maria morena"
I like it :)

I think overused words rather than lines are easier to identify...I paid more attention than usual to the lyrics of some of my favorite songs today and there aren't really any overused lines in them.
 
#5
Guaguanco.

I've noticed a lot of songs advertise their genre, particularly guaguanco, but also cha-cha-cha and others. In "En Mi Puertorro," Andy Montanez lets his audience know he's singing salsaton.
 
#7
I'm not sure where you've read that this was a bad thing. Perhaps you should read again? ;)

i'm just curious to know what line was 'often' (maybe you'd rather this word instead of overused?) used in salsa songs.
Indeed, when something is said to be "over"-anything, that typically implies that it is too much of that thing; "too much" meaning an undesirable amount. I tend to take things at their literal meaning. :)
 
#8
Singers who have to get extra publicity out of their songs. ("I'm Monchy, and I'm Alexandra!")

Prince Royce does that a lot, with some special effects. It's kind of funny, actually.
 
#15
“Nadie sabe como sufro yo” & "ya no estas a mi lado!"
Often referenced in songs since both are lines that appear on two latin american classic compositions considered to be standards.

Other lines or terms used in many songs are:

'El Son es lo mas sublime, con el alma divertir...'

'Donde esta miguel...'

'Y tu abuela, a donde esta?...'

'El que sabe... sabe...'

'Se soltaron los caballos'

'Vete! Yo no te bote...'

'Camina como yo'

'La rumba esta buena'

'A la pachanga'

'Bandolera'

'Aguaaaa'

'Repicalo!'
 
#16
I was looking at not being able to speak Spanish as a downside, but may be it is a good thing. If I understood the words, I may not have liked many songs. Most salsa songs sound nice to me, if I eventually learn Spanish, I may become more picky about what songs I dance to.
 
#17
I was looking at not being able to speak Spanish as a downside, but may be it is a good thing. If I understood the words, I may not have liked many songs. Most salsa songs sound nice to me, if I eventually learn Spanish, I may become more picky about what songs I dance to.
You probably will, but that isn't a bad thing. In fact the longer you dance, the more picky you will become even in terms of what music moves you to dance. I used to wonder why the best dancers didn't seem to go out as often as others. Then I realized that much of it was because they are more selective about what music they want to dance to.
 

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