"Lesson plan" for one-time salsa class?

#23
I personally would never teach a syncop . movement to a beginner class. The timing may lead to confusion .
Well even Suzy-Q is considered syncopated step, and it is indeed taught in many beginners classes.

So, what steps would you teach? (besides my suggested side steps and right turn)?

It is not at all constructive to offer criticism without alternative suggestions.
 
#24
It can get challenging enough just teaching the basic step. ;)

It's about what those students are there for.

*if...they were there because they wanted guidance becoming better dancers - you could spend the entire lesson teaching "proper technique!"

-But chances are your students are there just to have fun, dancing some salsa. (And that's it).

---

*Keep the stories to SF~
*Keep it simple.
*And keep them students active! All the time!
So, make up your mind...you are suggesting basic step technique for the entire solo part of the class, or to keep it simple and do a few steps taught at a more simple and not so in-depth level?

Once again, as I was saying to terence, criticism and opinions without constructive suggestions are not helpful.

Criticizing is easy, we're all experts at that on SF ;)
 
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#25
So, make up your mind...you are suggesting basic step technique for the entire solo part of the class, or to keep it simple and do a few steps taught at a more simple and not so in-depth level?

Once again, as I was saying to terence, criticism and opinions without constructive suggestions are not helpful.

Criticizing is easy, we're all experts at that on SF ;)
you are suggesting basic step technique for the entire solo part
No, I was suggesting that even something as 'simple' as basic step (without in-depth technique) - is not as simple to instruct. (Let alone syncopated steps).

*For 'evidence' - I provided a video that I deem very useful (and hilarious!)

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What to focus on: Fun: Keep your students active, with a constant feel of being succesful!

What could be anti-fun (in that certain class): History, Technique, thorough explanations & stories, losing concentration, confusion, failure...

What's a plenty of moves to learn in one lesson:
-Basic step (in place).
-Forward and Backward basic step.
-Basic turn (follows); basic turn (leads).
-CBL.

Some general thumb rules:

*Try not to say more than 3 sentences without making your students move.
*Talk short, clear and very very specific. (Watched the video yet?)
*Demonstrate while breaking down. (Not: First explain, then demonstrate).
*Get the students to know 'what' you are talking about before you get to the 'how' to do that.
*Remember to ask if they have any questions.
*Practice each 'section', preferably at an increasing speed.
*if practicing without music: remember to count in advance. (So they all know when to start).
*Remember to ask if there are any questions.

Any questions? :p
 
#29
I don't consider Suzy-Q is syncopated step. All the steps happen on counts (1-2-3). Syncopation for me is when you use the "and" between counts.

So last night the teacher was sick and I stepped in to teach class with one of the other advanced students. I followed the pattern that I explained before and it went rather well. Once everyone paired up for the partnerwork, I did go through connection a little. We started in open hold and I spoke about having a fingertip connection, no thumbs for the guys, lower the hands down to waist level.
 
#31
I personally would never teach a syncop . movement to a beginner class. The timing may lead to confusion .
Agree. Demonstrate it, but teach simple step to follow. Unless this audience already knows partner dances (doubtful), I don't think this class will get past stepping in place in 1 hour.... or do your students in group classes "get" salsa in an hour or less ?
 
#32
Agree. Demonstrate it, but teach simple step to follow. Unless this audience already knows partner dances (doubtful), I don't think this class will get past stepping in place in 1 hour.... or do your students in group classes "get" salsa in an hour or less ?
Once again, critique without alternative suggestions. :rolleyes:

*Which* "simple" steps exactly would you suggest? (Besides stepping in place, basic, side step, right turn which were already mentioned.)
 
#33
To all the people who are now replying to Terence's 'no syncopated steps' just to continue saying 'no syncopated steps' -- ok, noted. Let's not keep talking about 'no syncopated steps' any further. Please suggest "simple non-syncopated steps" you would teach if you want to give useful feedback.
 

vit

Son Montuno
#36
To all the people who are now replying to Terence's 'no syncopated steps' just to continue saying 'no syncopated steps' -- ok, noted. Let's not keep talking about 'no syncopated steps' any further. Please suggest "simple non-syncopated steps" you would teach if you want to give useful feedback.
Have in mind you can get a group where people never danced anything or a group where people already did some salsa dancing, or people that did some social ballroom (or some other genre) dancing so be prepared to adjust the plan on the fly. It's not bad to have more stuff planned than actually taught, even some suzy-q-s, then decide what to actually use on the class and whether teach less or more than initially planned. You need to determine where are the limits of the group and what are their main problems during the class

I would try to make point on stepping/marking rhythm (as already suggested), because in this area people usually think of dance steps as intention to move leg from point A to point B in particular direction, so try giving them right approach from the beginning. So some steps at place, side steps, basic steps, back steps only, back steps with some turn to each side etc ... whatever to get them moving on the beat. Doing anything syncopated probably isn't really a good idea, have in mind that many people might have problems to even get the 1 ... also, have in mind that the amount of new stuff people can absorb during 1 class is quite limited ...
 
#37
Well even Suzy-Q is considered syncopated step, and it is indeed taught in many beginners classes.

So, what steps would you teach? (besides my suggested side steps and right turn)?

It is not at all constructive to offer criticism without alternative suggestions.
I guess you didn't read my post. I gave you suggested figures.

As to Suzy Q, where is the Syncop. ? .

One has to consider, as you pointed out, it's a "one " off class and the figures I suggested are more than enough to keep a newbie occupied, particularly with partner changes .
.
PS...... I never teach side steps to beginners, in matter of fact, I'm not a lover of them as they are more complex rhythmically and technically than they appear to be .
 
#38
I

All the steps happen on counts (1-2-3). Syncopation for me is when you use the "and" between counts.

Once everyone paired up for the partnerwork, I did go through connection a little.

We started in open hold
THE most important thing to establish for all students is the HOLD and FRAME. NO good lead can be developed without this . From this position we are able to demo. the alternative positions that emanate from the close "hold " .
 

vit

Son Montuno
#39
PS...... I never teach side steps to beginners, in matter of fact, I'm not a lover of them as they are more complex rhythmically and technically than they appear to be .
Can you elaborate on this?

I mean, on the classes we also did side steps as a part of warmup and teachers called them "rumba steps" which of course they were not, as the way how rumba is danced is quite different
But if you simply do the steps at place, slightly forward, backward or side, isn't it rhythmically pretty much the same ?
 
#40
Can you elaborate on this?

if you simply do the steps at place, slightly forward, backward or side, isn't it rhythmically pretty much the same ?
IF taught correctly ( which is rare ) the CM action that should occur is more often than not, ignored. Just "stepping" to the side has little or no value in expressing the directional motion . And no, they are NOT the same, not the way I teach them.

One more time, a "basic " foundational step is more complex than meets the eye !!
 

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