How to avoid or reduce getting sweat at dancing

#1
Some people get sweat and some people don't. I was amazed that some guy who wore a suit, vest, button sleeved, and slack doesn't get sweat. For me, after the first 4 dance, my face was dripping sweat. The room was not hot. I am trying to figure out what made me sweat alot. Was that had to with my body muscle having too much tension during the dance which was suppose to be relaxed that could be reason I get sweat alot? Does anyone know a list of possibles that cause sweat and what can it be improved?
 
#2
When muscles work they produce heat and the body has to sweat to maintain its temperature. I don't see other ways of reducing sweating than getting fewer muscles to work at the same time or get them to work with less intensity. Or dance in Antarctica :)
 
#5
Some people get sweat and some people don't. I was amazed that some guy who wore a suit, vest, button sleeved, and slack doesn't get sweat. For me, after the first 4 dance, my face was dripping sweat. The room was not hot. I am trying to figure out what made me sweat alot. Was that had to with my body muscle having too much tension during the dance which was suppose to be relaxed that could be reason I get sweat alot? Does anyone know a list of possibles that cause sweat and what can it be improved?
1) Don't dance every dance. This I learned from Mouaze.
2) Find out were are all air conditioning units in the room.
2a) Windows, doors. Dance next to the doorway. This I learned from SuperMario.
3) Don't get excited during dance, think about currency rates or raindrops. Just kidding.
4) Improve your technique. This will make your movements more efficient. Less energy will be needed to perform same movements.
5) Improve your endurance and muscle strength. This will make them to consume less energy, per same movement.
6) Don't wear stupid clothes. Wear thin linen clothing.
7) Keep distance from your partner, especially(!) if she's hot!
 
#6
1) Don't dance every dance. This I learned from Mouaze.
2) Find out were are all air conditioning units in the room.
2a) Windows, doors. Dance next to the doorway. This I learned from SuperMario.
3) Don't get excited during dance, think about currency rates or raindrops. Just kidding.
4) Improve your technique. This will make your movements more efficient. Less energy will be needed to perform same movements.
5) Improve your endurance and muscle strength. This will make them to consume less energy, per same movement.
6) Don't wear stupid clothes. Wear thin linen clothing.
7) Keep distance from your partner, especially(!) if she's hot!
I appreciated your advice!

For sure 1, 3, 5 and maybe 4. Time for me to hit back to the gym!
 
#7
1. Look for moisture-wicking quick-drying clothing, like Uniqlo 'dry-tech', or shirts from REI.
2. Stand in front of fan between dances.
3. Know that as you get more experienced, you'll also be more relaxed and efficient in your movements.
 
#8
Actually having gone down the "wicking shirt" route for years, without much success, I've changed tack more recently.

a) Wear 2 layers e.g. t-shirt and a shirt. This will make you sweat MORE, but the outer layer will stay dry while the inner layer soaks up sweat - and so the followers won't be grossed out touching you.
b) Bring a couple of changes of t-shirt for your under-layer.
 
#9
1. Look for moisture-wicking quick-drying clothing, like Uniqlo 'dry-tech', or shirts from REI.
1. The moisture-wicking quick-drying is not going make to help you sweat less!
2. As has been said several times, it make quick-dry you but anyone that touches your moisture-wicking quick-drying clothing will feel the wet.

From my experience all the moisture-wicking fabrics are polyster, something I absolutely refuse to wear. I prefer 100% cotton (which has very bad property of absorbing all the sweat and becoming very wet), wool or silk. I would like bamboo based clothing, but it is not easily available and is relatively very expensive. There is no reason for bamboo based clothes to be expensive but they run two or three times the cotton clothes.

I always wear undershirt. Growing up I was always taught that the undershirt is an undergarment and must be worn. It become a habit. Especially in tropical countries you have to wear undershirts/banyans/whatever-you-want-to-call. The so called wife-beaters used to be undershirts when I was growing up. Not sure when it become fashionable to wear them out :) And I was quite amazed that most people only wear one layer of shirts out here when I first moved. And the silicon valley has the worst sense of dressing which they wear as a pride!! Hardly anyone use to iron their shirts. I need to iron even the so call non-iron shirts.
 
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#11
Does anyone know a list of possibles that cause sweat and what can it be improved?
If I am sweating, I usually sit out next one or two dances, go to wash room and clean myself. If it warrants, I will change the shirts.

As others have said, find a spot next to fan, open window or air-condition vents when you dance.

Depending on how hard I dance, I can sweat a lot or not at all.
 
#12
I think it is very important to have 2 layers. The first layer to absorb your sweat and the second layer for your dance partner to be touching.

The easiest thing is to have a t-shirt that is good at absorbing and then on top of that, a cotton button up shirt with a collar. I don't even button up the top shirt. If the top shirt is a fabric that doesn't absorb moisture much, it should take a good amount of time for it to get sweaty from the shirt below, I would say 15 straight songs depending on the heat.

One of the other keys is to use paper towels to get the sweat off your forehead, neck, and hair so it doesn't all start dripping down and soak your collar and such.

Once the top layer does start to get sweaty after an hour of dancing without breaks, then you just pick up your second button up shirt and swap them out, should only take you 10 seconds so you won't even have to miss a song.
 

azana

Super Moderator
Staff member
#13
I don't think I'll give away my secrets, but lots of hidden safety pins are involved :) .

I was surprised when I moved to Australia, as people would constantly comment on my Japanese fans (I usually have a couple of 100yen fans with me) and what a good idea they were, while trying to create a breeze with an event flyer or even their hand. It's not too difficult to find and purchase a fan, but people here seem to simply prefer to comment on them, with only my Japanese friends and I actually bringing and using them.

My most regular regular lead and I (my regulars tend to dance with me from 3 up to 7 times a night) just head for OUR spot, by the doorway and stairs. The other couples and the doorpeople know we have it tagged :) .
 
#14
I was surprised when I moved to Australia, as people would constantly comment on my Japanese fans (I usually have a couple of 100yen fans with me) and what a good idea they were, while trying to create a breeze with an event flyer or even their hand.
Fans were popular on hot nights among some of the Seattle salsa follows a few years ago, then they disappeared for some reason. Still see them occasionally at tango.
 
#15
Your propensity for sweating is going to be based on your genetics. Nothing you can do about that. You are probably going to sweat if you are nervous. You are probably going to sweat if you exercise vigorously.

These days I just try to wear shirts that don't show the sweat. Black shirts these days. I also bring a black bandana which easily fits into my back pocket and is generally invisible. Fortunately most of the places I go are air conditioned but I can sometimes be found outside cooling off in the night air. If I'm in a particularly warm and humid location, like Miami or New York (in the summer) then I might bring a second shirt to change into.

I've encounter a number of followers who sweat profusely so I can image what is like to dance with me on one of those kind of nights. I do the best I can to keep the dance pleasant. It is also possible to tailor you dancing to minimize contact with your partner.

The biggest problem I encounter is if I've had suntan lotion on my face that day. Then if the sweat runs into my eyes I'm blinded.
 
#17
I know it common that people wear 2 layers. First layer would be a regular tshirt and the second layer would be button up shirt/long sleeved as to look nice. Is it recommend to get a first layer tshirt that are quick absorb/quick-dry like a polyster or whatever type of fabric instead of 100% cotton? Will that resist longer enough making the second layer button up shirt from getting wet?
 
#18
I'd think in terms of comfort for your first layer.

If you sweat a lot, and you wear two layers, assume that your first layer will get sweaty pretty quickly no matter what happens - and bring a couple of changes with you.
 
#19
1. The moisture-wicking quick-drying is not going make to help you sweat less!
2. As has been said several times, it make quick-dry you but anyone that touches your moisture-wicking quick-drying clothing will feel the wet.
What I find works best for me is a cotton shirt, and a light 'dry-tech' sport coat from Uniqlo. The sport coat never seems to get soaked, and it keeps any sweat from getting to my partners.
 
#20
I always wear undershirt. Growing up I was always taught that the undershirt is an undergarment and must be worn. It become a habit. Especially in tropical countries you have to wear undershirts/banyans/whatever-you-want-to-call.
Why? To soak up the sweat before it makes your shirt look scruffy? The problem is that the extra layer makes you sweat more. And if it's a wifebeater then it won't even catch the sweat under your pits.

Useful in cold weather though.
 

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