Guaracha definition

#24
The best thing is to listen to the explanation of musician explaining what guaracha is. Look on YouTube seach for Michael de Miranda, Guaracha lesson.
This is the definition of guaracha by the salsa music dictionary from John Storm Roberts:
Guaracha - The original Cuban guaracha was a topical song form for chorus and solo voice, with improvisation in the solo. It was presented in 3/4 and 6/8 or 2/4 time signature. The guaracha developed a second section, employed for much improvisation, as in the son montuno. It appeared to have almost died out in Cuba by the 1930s, yet it is now one of the forms commonly used by salsa groups; a fast rhythm with a basic chicka-chicka pulse. Its last section is the probable source of the instrumental mambo. The guaracha is said to have originated in 18th-century maison d'assignation and its lyrics are still often racy and satirical.

Something which has a structure of 3/4, 6/8 and 2/4 is actually a kind of rumba, this developed in the teatro bufo in Havana Cuba in the 19th century and came to Puerto Rico, where the guaracha is also very popular as well as in New York.
 
#25
Something which has a structure of 3/4, 6/8 and 2/4 is actually a kind of rumba, this developed in the teatro bufo in Havana Cuba
It's basic is the same as a Danzon, the " Box " ,with a different closing action on the first QQ(3, 4 ) to the side after the Fwd slow .

It was included in the A Murray Gold sylb; (circa 1950s )
We also used some songs for Mambo..
 
#26
It has nothing to do with Danzon! The Cuban contradanza composed by Cuban composers from Matanzas used so called 'rumbas de callejeras' or congas during carnaval season, copying the rhythmical structures into the contradanzas!

Murray was a ballroom teacher this has nothing to do with authentic Cuban or Puertorican dance and music!
 
#27
It has nothing to do with Danzon! The Cuban contradanza composed by Cuban composers from Matanzas used so called 'rumbas de callejeras' or congas during carnaval season, copying the rhythmical structures into the contradanzas!

Murray was a ballroom teacher this has nothing to do with authentic Cuban or Puertorican dance and music!
I beg to differ. The construction of the Rumba they teach ( Box ) is identical and common to both as are many of the variations.

And, why do you completely disregard the fact that, teachers from AM visited Cuba for their inspirations ?;

IF you are speaking to only indigenous forms of music, and dance, as in Son etc. then we are in agreement, but the fact remains if one compares Danzon , as seen in many vids, and then compare the Rumba basic, they are identical...

Fact is, if you want purety, then solo Rumba is the only true form.
Dance evolves, and as long as the roots remain intact, then it speaks to it's antecedents.
 
#28
Arturo Murray copied the Cuban Son of the 1940s and called it 'rhumba' it was prepared for the American middle classes.

Guaracha is what Noro Morales, Tito Rodriguez, Tito Puente and last but not least Celia Cruz and Johnny Pacheco played look how Celia dances guaracha with Johhny in the DVD Fania All Stars in Africa...
 
#29
Arturo Murray copied the Cuban Son of the 1940s and called it 'rhumba' it was prepared for the American middle classes.

Guaracha is what Noro Morales, Tito Rodriguez, Tito Puente and last but not least Celia Cruz and Johnny Pacheco played look how Celia dances guaracha with Johhny in the DVD Fania All Stars in Africa...
I'm well aware of it's emergence. I was being taught this style in the UK in the 1940s... And I taught the very same thing ( as I now do in the UK ) for AM in the 50s and on..

And, I danced "live " to all you named, many times( except Celia ) .My knowledge , does NOT come from a book, but is empirical
 
#30
If you have nothing to say about the guaracha, would you mind to start a thread called Arthur Murray and ballroom dancing from the 1940s.

The guaracha is a genre of Cuban popular music of rapid tempo and comic or picaresque lyrics.The word had been used in this sense at least since the late 18th and early 19th century. Guarachas were played and sung in musical theatres and in low-class dance salons. They became an integral part of bufo comic theatre in the mid-19th century.During the later 19th and the early 20th century the guaracha was a favourite musical form in the brothels of Havana. The guaracha survives today in the repertoires of some trova musicians, conjuntos and Cuban-style big bands.

During the 19th century, the bufo theatre, with its robust humour, its creolized characters and its guarachas, played a part in the movement for the emancipation of slaves and the independence of Cuba. They played a part in criticising authorities, lampooning public figures and supporting heroic revolutionaries.Satire and humour are significant weapons for a subjugated people.

In 1869 at the Teatro Villanueva in Havana an anti-Spanish bufo was playing, when suddenly some Spanish Voluntarios attacked the theatre, killing some ten or so patrons. The context was that the Ten Years' War had started the previous year, when Carlos Manuel de Céspedes had freed his slaves, and declared Cuban independence. Creole sentiments were running high, and the Colonial government and their rich Spanish traders were reacting. Not for the first or the last time, politics and music were closely intertwined, for musicians had been integrated since before 1800. Bufo theatres were shut down for some years after this tragic event.
 
#31
The guaracha is a genre of Cuban popular music of rapid tempo and comic or picaresque lyrics survives today in the repertoires of some trova musicians, conjuntos and Cuban-style big bands.
.
All of your posts, are simply regurgitations, of articles that have been around dance sites for many moons, And, no one is ( including me ) disagreeing with the MUSICAL heritage.

My comments are strictly pointed at the " Dance ". and its evolution at the social level..

And, as you seem to enjoy "dates " for establishing comment, here are some for you.

In 1936, a world reknowned couple from CUBA, came to Europe giving demos of Rumba which was in the SQUARE form ( Like Danzon ) their name..Raoul and Eva Reyes . Cuban bands were playing in London at that time, playing fast rumbas ( guaracha's ) to which the square form was danced.

The Lecuona Boys and Don Azpiazu, were 2 notable Cuban bands, that were featured..
 
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#32
We still got the very old hat of Cuban Son from the 1930s and 1940s which was 'rhumba' in ballroom circles. Your dance remarks have to do with old hat and nothing with the Cuban guaracha, a very old rumba.

Instead of writing very long articles with the same message which can already be found on the Internet, I sometimes use these sources. I have studied the Guaracha from the Spanish sources but most people do not read them! Did you see that the rumba which was forbidden in Cuba can be played by guitars. The Guaracha was the national song (and rumba) for Cuban independence and also popular in Puerto Rico which was also occupied by the Spanish and wanted independence!

Saludos,
Arsenio123
 
#33
I have a question about the Guaracha. I've been reading information which suggests that the word for Guaracha was used back in the 17th century and that the musical style itself was in use in the bufo theatres back in the mid-19th century. Yet, the Son reportedly was in use in Cuba going back only to the late 19th century.

Therefore, did the Guaracha somehow predate the Son? If so, did the Son change the original pre-existing Guaracha?
 
#34
It has nothing to do with Danzon! The Cuban contradanza composed by Cuban composers from Matanzas used so called 'rumbas de callejeras' or congas during carnaval season, copying the rhythmical structures into the contradanzas!

Murray was a ballroom teacher this has nothing to do with authentic Cuban or Puertorican dance and music!
I'm speaking about the "dance " NOT the musical construction of which I am well aware .
And, I also am well aware of AM and did not infer that the studios were the pinnacle of latin music or indigenous dance.. None the less, Guaracha was taught in the same format ( basics ) that were common to the original using the correct music which is more than I can say about todays "dancers " .

Social dance styles evolve and if they did not, we all would be dancing solo !..They at least, did promote on a national basis ( States ) a latin dance format that advanced the interest of the general population to explore the genres in greater detail as we do today.

So.. when you can show me where Son,Mambo, Guajira etc are all being danced and taught as originals , with the correct music THEN will you get my attention .
I have always to my best ability as a teacher, strived to use music in my lessons that reflects an appropriate indigenous style .
 
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#39
haha the comments on this video are hilarious. you guys should check them out. this video is a literal disaster. First of all, rumba has no place during a casino dance. to do rumba "shines" you have to break the connection and dance solo. either dance casino, or dance rumba. look, I don't mind a bar or two of shines during a casino dance, but this is, as @terence said, painful to watch. the whole time I was just feeling so sorry for the follower who was probably looking forward to a nice dance with an actual person, yet ended up dancing predominantly by herself. not to mention that the song doesn't have ANY rumba section. so the guy is doing all these rumba shines, mixing Colombia with guaguanco and yambu indiscriminately...and its not musically relevant at all.

:hungover:
 
#40
I have a question about the Guaracha. I've been reading information which suggests that the word for Guaracha was used back in the 17th century and that the musical style itself was in use in the bufo theatres back in the mid-19th century. Yet, the Son reportedly was in use in Cuba going back only to the late 19th century.

Therefore, did the Guaracha somehow predate the Son? If so, did the Son change the original pre-existing Guaracha?
Here is an article about Celia Cruz from NPR, which is related to the topic somewhat:
https://www.npr.org/2018/02/13/5840...ign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20180213.
Here is the Album and a list of the songs on it. Some might be familiar to you:
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