Casino: The third position (caída position, V-shape, dile que no position)

#41
I'm just saying that empirically from the way the Son is taught and danced ... it isn't done that way.
But.. does that make it correct ???.

common sense prevails that , IF man turns the body to the left a bigger aperture will occur. The mans body position really ( in the frame ) essentially stays close and commences to rotate to the left as lady progresses across mans pathway in the circular fashion..
 

vit

Son Montuno
#42
The right foot behind the left that you mention at :21 is the end of a Cedazo (The Son/Cuban Danzón "Tight Turn") ... it's not part of the lead structure for the Apertura ....
Well, he is using this principle for leading whole of the time, including here ... it's what makes a difference between great and average dancer - things are seamlessly connected and the follower feels like being driven in the Rolce Royce instead of Hyundai ... Of course I'm not saying it's the only thing he is using ... and many followers will prefer Hyundai and find RR boring ...
 
#43
The music or the dance?

I think from the general structure ... it's pretty clear that the dance of Son is a direct (and gradual) development from the danzón.
The dance ...and,

the Danzon is of a Square design As you know ), and teaching it I have never thought of Caida as a natural figure in the dance. Of course, I could find opportunities as many steps are easy to adopt Most of the rotation in Danzon is in closed position as in walking forwards and back in the circular, and simple forward and back walks.
 
#45
But.. does that make it correct ???.

common sense prevails that , IF man turns the body to the left a bigger aperture will occur. The mans body position really ( in the frame ) essentially stays close and commences to rotate to the left as lady progresses across mans pathway in the circular fashion..
An interesting question ... "Is it correct?" I suppose that tradition versus a rigorous analysis of body mechanics might explain why Cuban son masters do it a certain way. It might be something to do with the philosophy of the Cuban lead (in Son and Casino), which doesn't emphasize counterrotation or push-pull type structure (like stepping back or other mechanisms to create dynamic tension or this rotate in one direction and then rotate in the other) ....
 
#46
The dance ...and,

the Danzon is of a Square design As you know ), and teaching it I have never thought of Caida as a natural figure in the dance. Of course, I could find opportunities as many steps are easy to adopt Most of the rotation in Danzon is in closed position as in walking forwards and back in the circular, and simple forward and back walks.
The box step of course is essential in danzón .... Danzón is moribund in Cuba ... I've only witnessed people dancing it socially one time on the island ... Son basically dropped the box step and became more rounded is my guess. But the basic structure of son is danzón.
 
#47
The box step of course is essential in danzón .... Danzón is moribund in Cuba ... I've only witnessed people dancing it socially one time on the island ... Son basically dropped the box step and became more rounded is my guess. But the basic structure of son is danzón.
I saw it danced in Tampa ( clubs there were 99% latino and cubano's dominated the scene ). I also danced it there on rare occasions with very basic movements and it always elicited comments . I still teach this today to all my students as I find this more suitable to the music and its simplicity than the other forms .

I believe it is used more for shows..
 

vit

Son Montuno
#48
An interesting question ... "Is it correct?" I suppose that tradition versus a rigorous analysis of body mechanics might explain why Cuban son masters do it a certain way. It might be something to do with the philosophy of the Cuban lead (in Son and Casino), which doesn't emphasize counterrotation or push-pull type structure (like stepping back or other mechanisms to create dynamic tension or this rotate in one direction and then rotate in the other) ....
I think that one of most important reasons is mostly closed hold vs mostly open hold. In closed hold one has to use the body to lead the partner, because once you start using arms, you are quickly out of closed hold. In more open hold, there is much more opportunity to use arms, create tensions, slingshots, whatever ... And of course, things are not black and white, closed hold can be more closed or less closed and one can be good in using the body or not that good, and in open hold, you can use more tension or less tension or (almost) zero tension and rely on body/shaping lead ... both versions can be good or bad ... just like both Rols and Porsche are good cars, but of totally different nature, so pick your preference ...
 
#50
Yes, so far as I know it was named by Yoel for reasons of clarity in his lessons and as a way to distinguish between posición cerrada and posición abierta, indeed it is sort of a 50/50 between cerrada and abierta. In Spanish “la caída” means “the fall” and I believe it’s a fitting name because many, many patterns and figures follow from posición de caída.
 

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